Calendar

June 2017
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  

Calendar

June 2017
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  

Follow us on…

  • {name}
  • Google Profile
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • YouTube
  • slideshare

Facebook

Recent videos

Posted on: March 08-2017 | By : Harish Rijhwani | In: Analytics,Digital Modernization,Healthcare Informatics,Innovation,Intelligent Business,Internet of Things,Mobility | 4 Comments

Did you ever think that one day your toothbrush would tell you if you have brushed your teeth well? Or for that matter your refrigerator would give an indication that you need to buy groceries. I never did but that is the world we are currently living in – Fast, ever evolving and always connected. To reach this point it has taken sometime and in this blog we will go back a little in time to understand how we reached the stage of being ever connected via – Internet of Things.

It was in 1969 when an experiment to connect two entities “Stanford University” and the “University of California” was conducted. After this in 1982 TCP/IP emerged as the protocol for ARPANET. This was the network to implement the basic communication language used on the Internet (TCP/IP protocol) and also use packet switching**. This was the basis of the Internet becoming a reality and the world slowly started to connect with each other. In the year 1989 Interop’s (Technology Conference) President Dan Lynch threw up a challenge to John Romkey to see if he could connect a toaster to the Internet. John worked with his friend Simon Hackett to connect a Sunbeam Deluxe Toaster to the internet. This was demonstrated in 1990 at the Interop Conference and became a huge hit/success. The solution at that point in time was not automated end-to-end since the bread still had to be put in manually. This was also automated by 1991 by adding a small robotic crane in the solution. It is very interesting to know that at the time this was achieved there were only 310K computers and only 3.1 million people had access to the internet.

There was no name given to this achievement and only in 1999 did Kevin Ashton coined the term “Internet of Things”. Evidently Kevin Ashton used the term as part of his presentation to Proctor and Gamble where he was linking the idea of using

RFIDs in P&G’s supply chain and the internet.  In the year 2000 LG came up with the first Internet connected refrigerator. It used RFIDs and barcodes to sense which items were in the fridge. This product was not very successful as it was expensive and also it did not solve any specific problems. A simple example, mostly all juice bottles are transparent one can visually decide if a purchase is required or not. Another aspect, which was in question was security, what if internet viruses would hack into your refrigerator system and open your fridge door. Today systems use Gmail to setup the same and one could hack into your email accounts if the system is weak. In the year 2005 United Nations globally recognized the Internet of things and also predicted that humans could be a minority as generators and receivers of traffic. Interesting to note the example quoted was of tiny sensors being used to check the Golden Gate Bridge (San Francisco) for structural damage. The list can go on and some of the more recent examples are Bluetooth enabled devices (mostly we all use one in our cell phones), self-driving vehicles, and google glass. When we look at the healthcare market it is expected to reach around $117 billion by 2020 along with this overall 40% of the IoT devices by then will be health related. I want to cite one specific example related to healthcare. If you are a fan of video games you would have heard of MYO a gesture controlled Armband. You can basically control your computer by waving your wrists to do things. Now you will ask me where is healthcare in this? Actually MYO armbands are used in physiotherapy treatments for fractures and measure how well the patient is responding to treatment. Well that is it for now, till next time. ** For those of you who don’t know packet switching is simply breaking the source message into smaller parts, sending it and reassembling it at the destination.   References http://www.computerhistory.org/internethistory/ http://www.postscapes.com/internet-of-things-history/ http://www.livescience.com/20727-internet-history.html http://www.baselinemag.com/networking/slideshows/a-brief-history-of-the-internet-of-things.html http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/4440334.stm  
My PageMy Page

Harish Rijhwani
Harish C. Rijhwani is a Delivery Manager at Syntel with 14+ years of experience in Healthcare...

 
Posted on: March 21-2016 | By : Visukumar Gopal | In: Analytics,CxO Innovation,Innovation,Intelligent Business,Project Management,Software Development | No Comments
We have already seen why it is important to invest in PMCoE, however, establishing it requires real dedication and commitment to create value for the organization. To extract true value from PMCoE, it needs autonomy. To enhance efficiency of any organization, the PMCoE brings cross-project utilization; repeatable processes; improved asset sharing and best practices across geographically distributed teams, under one umbrella. PMCoE should also build standard and strong academy and preparedness for continuous improvement, these characteristics are very important for this centralized function.
My PageMy Page

Visukumar Gopal
Visukumar Gopal is Practice Head, LEAN & Knowledge Management at Syntel. He has over 20 years...

 
Posted on: February 26-2016 | By : Visukumar Gopal | In: Business Agility,CxO Innovation,Enterprise Technology,Innovation,Intelligent Business,Leadership,Managing Business Risks,Project Management | 2 Comments
An organization’s operational efficiency is largely dependent on how well it manages different projects. This calls for a well-defined project management approach that ensure projects achieving all predetermined goals with optimized allocation of resources. A Project Management Center of Excellence (PMCoE) enables organizations to have an enterprise level approach towards project management. PMCoE serves as a centralized body or function which has the autonomy to educate, energize and enrich people knowledge. This entity also has the excellence, best practices and expertise on project management.  
I will be focusing on some core concepts in the blog series, where I will highlight the importance of PMCoE in all industries.   Let us start by discussing the prerequisites of creating a PMCoE.   Project Management and Project Managers have never been more important to the accomplishment of corporate work scopes. An increased emphasis on performance, accountability, and cost-effectiveness is driving industries to reassess work scope planning and execution. Organizations are using Project management as ‘the tool’ for effective streamlining. This change, however, requires planning. No longer can workforce size, resources, training, or experience alone help organizations to achieve their goals. Accomplishment begins with judicious alignment of resources, a shift in corporate culture, and with a committed management team. It is a journey to excellence.   Cultural shift towards Project Management has been on going. To achieve a more complete transition, it is important to empower resources at every levels of the management. Involving all levels of management immediately sends the message of total commitment. Continued work toward institutionalizing the process also strengthens this effort. Pushing change requires wide spread, committed involvement. It keeps things moving.   Project management is one of the critical levers for organizational success. Today, organizations which excel in delivering their business are often at a higher degree of project management maturity than others that have not progressed in the path of successful project management implementation.   Sometime there is a lot of doubt over adoption of either a top-down or bottom-up approach for implementing new processes and culture. The organization’s culture has to support transformation at all levels. The leadership team is the key driver of enhancements needed by the organization. They authorize implementation efforts, exemplify practices, and provide support, while the operations teams have to have the buy-in necessary for the actual implementation of the project. Cooperation between the leadership team and operations team is essential to ensure the level of excellence expected by implementing project management principles.   In the next blog, I will be covering Characteristics of a successful PMCoE. Stay tuned.
My PageMy Page

Visukumar Gopal
Visukumar Gopal is Practice Head, LEAN & Knowledge Management at Syntel. He has over 20 years...

 
Posted on: December 12-2015 | By : Swati Phalke | In: Big Data,Cloud,Digital Solutions,Innovation,Mobility,Software Development | 1 Comment
As we entered the 21st century, the Information Technology industry was celebrating the success of Y2K and then got overwhelmed with Dotcom. Enterprises started to automate their processes using Web 1.0, and a number of Dotcom start-ups came into existence. Later, due to financial crisis only select few survived the pressure.

Author
Swati Phalke

My PageMy Page

Swati Phalke
Swati Phalke is Practice Director, Digital One at Syntel. She has over 19 years of technical and...

 
 

Recent Posts

© 2017 Syntel, Inc.