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Posted on: July 11-2017 | By : Prashant Ranade | In: Industries | No Comments

Whether we are ready for it or not, the digital age is upon us. Not a day goes by without reading or hearing about some digital disruption in today’s global economy, as more companies build their business models on next-generation technology.


While it has created new opportunities, digital also forces CEOs to understand how to effectively use technology in today’s fast-paced, on-demand world.


To truly "go digital" requires seamless end-to-end technology integration, not just a swanky front-end app, because "anytime," "anywhere," and "always-on" are the true barometers of a digital enterprise.


For the CEO, this poses a complex challenge: how to improve efficiency, agility and speed to market, reduce run-the-business costs and channel this savings into change-the-business efforts.


Clearly, the central challenge of digital modernization is adapting to change, but at its core, digital is like any other technological innovation. Innovation can enable us to do something completely new, such as in the case of air travel, x-ray technology and television. In the digital age, this is exemplified by the payments industry. Anyone can now process credit cards, buy a coffee using just their phone, or even pay for items as they are placed in a shipping basket.


Innovation can also enable us to do something more easily, more efficiently, or more elegantly. Examples from the past include more efficient travel via automobile or more convenient communication by mobile phone.


In today’s travel industry, the core products and services — like reserving and purchasing airline tickets or rental cars — have not changed, but mobile technology has now enabled an easier, more convenient, and more elegant way to manage travel.


The fundamental job of a CEO is to look at their business and decide the "what" and the "why" of the business and figure out how to create a differentiated offering. The CEO then needs to ask the question: Do I want to do something completely new, do I want to make my existing business more elegant or efficient, or strike a balance between the two?


Once that is decided, it is time to engage your outsourcing partner.


How Your Outsourcing Partner Can Help

Here are some ways an outsourcing partner can help CEOs navigate the digital landscape:

  • Stay current on the latest technology

    Your company may operate an airline, issue credit cards, provide banking, investment or insurance services, or manufacture a product—and it’s the CEO’s job to focus on this core business. With the rapid pace of change in the digital age, it’s almost an impossible task for a CEO or their teams to stay current on numerous complex technologies. Moreover, digital technologies are constantly evolving, and the "latest and greatest" tech may not be mature enough for your business. Your outsourcing partner’s core business is technology. Let them do the research, training, and heavy lifting. They should explore how new technologies can benefit, damage, or otherwise affect your business.


    In the face of digital disruption, there may be a point where you need to make tough decisions on which systems to retain and manage, which to migrate to new platforms, and which need to be re-invented and modernized completely. A trusted and experienced partner can help walk you through this decision, and a strong ecosystem of partners can improve reliability and speed to market.


  • Provide the scale you need to support your business.

    The mantra today is lean and efficient, both for staffing as well as for skills. Hiring and training is expensive, so let your partner bear the risk and burden of keeping enough staff on hand to handle peaks and valleys in demand – it is their business. They should be able to provide recommendations to build human and computing architectures that can scale as you grow. Above all, be intellectually honest. Tell your partner where you want the business to take you, and ensure that their plan can scale for the long-term, not project by project. It’s best not to enter the discussion with preconceptions of "how big" or "how much" of any resource will be required. Experienced partners can employ strategies like managed services and automation to create scale where you thought there was a bottleneck.


  • Manage the cultural and communication aspects of technology projects.

    The challenges of managing complex projects over long distances and long time periods are well-documented. If you had to invent a process and methodology from scratch for every project, nothing would ever be finished. Be sure that your partner is well versed in the latest methodologies.


    As a CEO, you must clearly communicate the business needs, and let your partner recommend a suitable approach to achieve your goals. There are new development techniques like Distributed, Scaled, Offshore Agile or Ogile® can virtually erase geographic differences and bring teams from all across the globe together for a project.


With nearly two decades of experience as a CEO as both a user and a provider of outsourcing services, here is what I have learned:
  • It’s easy to get drawn into the technical or operational aspects of any project. Stay focused on the end game, and be clear about the outcomes you hope to achieve, not the "nuts and bolts" of a project.
  • Know what aspects of your business are outsourced, but retain your overall ownership of the project and be sure it is aligned with your business strategy.
  • When engaging with any kind of outsourcing partner, step back from the details and identify the business challenges that you want to solve or overcome. Remember that ultimately, you are responsible for the "what" and the "why" of the project.
  • Communicate these goals early and often, and let your partner do what they are best at – the "how."

There are many reasons to outsource in the digital age–technological, operational, cultural–but the visionary CEO will take a close look at their business to understand how best to use digital disruption to their advantage. Whether it’s finding a new way of doing business or simply an easier, efficient, or more elegant way of running current processes, CEOs must stay true to their business, focus on their core competency and see the big picture. Everything else is just ones and zeroes.


This article was originally published on The CEO Forum

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Prashant Ranade
Prashant Ranade is the Co-Chairman and former CEO of Syntel, a global provider of integrated IT and...

 
Posted on: December 12-2015 | By : Swati Phalke | In: Industries,Leadership | 1 Comment

Much has been written about the skewed ratio of female leaders in organizations, but there is much less research on how women can become leaders. There are many moments in a woman’s life when she has to make important career decisions, while growing professionally and personally.

 

I believe women are innate multitaskers, and can juggle different roles easily with their family’s support. To me, the operative word in “work-life balance” is balance, and here is how I try to maintain that balance while working in different roles.

  • Prioritization-Reprioritization: As leaders, we manage our workday by applying prioritization and reprioritization techniques. We should apply the same technique to our personal lives as well, in order to provide equal attention to all our undertakings.
  • Overcome the guilt factor: For a working mother, it is natural to feel guilty for not being able to devote the same attention to your children as a homemaker can. It is important to overcome this guilt by making up for the quantity of time with quality time. As professionals, we are well acquainted with the concept of quality over quantity, so that should be applied to your home life as well.
  • Positivity all around: Run away from all the negativity that surrounds you – use the ignore button tactfully. Learn from your colleagues, your team and your leaders, and look for the positive side in every interaction you have. I firmly believe that positivity and success go hand-in-hand, and these simple steps will create positivity in and around you.
  • De-stress yourself with small breaks: If you have the option to take small breaks, go for it. However, time management during these small breaks is extremely important, because they can also have adverse effects on your career. If not well planned, you can lose motivation, focus and confidence in your work. When you plan these breaks, be sure to set goals for them. After you have achieved your goal, you will feel rejuvenated and ready to resume your career race.
  • Respect domestic help: Domestic help is a working woman’s backbone. Getting help with household chores is a must, and you should think of it as an outsourcing program – complete with proper governance and a human touch. It is important to run a talent management and growth program at home, just the way we run them at work. Remember that your domestic service providers are also working professionals, so be sure to give respect so you are respected in return.

 

I have been practicing these guidelines with all my professional and personal stakeholders. It has helped me play my role effectively in boardroom, in the kitchen, and back in the boardroom.

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Swati Phalke

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Swati Phalke
Swati Phalke is Practice Director, Digital One at Syntel. She has over 19 years of technical and...

 
Posted on: March 25-2015 | By : Gary Ayingaran | In: Business Agility,Industries,Outsourcing and Technology Integration | 4 Comments
The IT industry is witnessing a dynamic shift, not just in technology, tools, infrastructure and methodology, but in the choice of geographical locations for outsourcing and offshoring, as well. As the outsourcing industry matures, a dynamic shift simultaneously takes place across regional outsourcing landscapes. Historically, organizations have been able to tap into relative wage differentials across geographies to build a strong value proposition for offshoring. While cost arbitrage continues to be a significant driver of global sourcing for most companies, the cost advantage is slowly diminishing due to factors like wage inflation, talent scarcity and throughput. Organizations, who are diversifying their outsourcing locations are looking for increased flexibility to service delivery, build new capabilities with access to local skill and to leverage the growth in the domestic economy.
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Gary Ayingaran
Gary Ayingaran is the Center Head of Syntel’s Philippines facility, where he manages operations...

 
Posted on: January 20-2015 | By : Dr. Sumit Rai | In: Healthcare Informatics,Industries | 1 Comment
Better care for individuals, better health for patients and lower per-capita costs form the triple aim of the U.S. healthcare reforms for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). The number of unplanned and avoidable readmissions that occur within 30 days of discharge from a hospital, too, are under the scanner to maintain the quality of care.
  The federal government has taken many steps such as incentivization and penalty under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to optimize and increase the quality and efficacy of the healthcare system. Medicare’s Hospital Readmission Reduction Program (HRRP) imposes financial penalty on hospitals with excess readmissions.
 

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Dr. Sumit Rai

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Dr. Sumit Rai
Dr. Sumit Rai is a Business Analyst, Healthcare Provider. He has over four years of experience...

 
Posted on: January 11-2013 | By : Syntel | In: Industries | No Comments
S'PrayasSyntel’s Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) - S’Prayas has been named as one of the finalists at the annual NASSCOM Social Innovation Honours (NSIH) 2013, in the Corporate – CSR Category.

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Syntel

 
 

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